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for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wondering where i am. we've been trying to make our way to the quake zone. the japanese military has taken over all the highways. obviously we're trying to steer clear of the nuclear power plant. we had to cut through the moun >> couric: tonight, emergency workers return to japan's crippled nuclear plant after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but
that there hasn't been a broader call for help from japan may have something to do with it. relief efforts right now are focused on immediate needs like food, water and medical care. all goods and services that can be purchased locally. internationally charities like the red cross, world vision and save the children are on the ground doi ining exactly that already. that's why cash donations now directed at those charities may be the best thing americans can do to help the victims when their need is the most. for more information, go to >>> that's it for me. brooke baldwin takes over now with "newsroom". >>> my promise to you, we won't get too far from japan chblt we'll get to the new images and information there in just a moment. >>> first, i want you to listen to what secretary of state hillary clinton has now just told cnn's wolf blitzer. >> we don't want any ambiguity. only the security council can authorize action, and if they do authorize action, there needs to be a true international response, including arab leadership and partnership. >> wolf is traveling right along with
on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and toda
forced from benjawahd and regrouped. >>> japan working to keep reactors cool and try to prevent radioactive water from leaking to the ocean. tons of water to keep fuel from overheating have been contaminated with radiation. workers are using sandbags and concrete panels to hold back the water. >>> pakistan's cricket team have been practicing for a game for which their world cup, standing, and national pride are at stake. on wednesday, pakistan plays india. a big match helping to soothe often bitter relations. thousands of people are expected to skip work to watch the game. i'm zain verjee in london. "world business today" starts now. >>> good morning from cnn london. >> and good afternoon from cnn hong kong, i'm pauline chu. this is kporld business today. the top stories on this wednesday, march 30, tepco's troubles keep mounting up. now the company's president has been hospitalized, apparently suffering from stress. >> high fuel prices and natural disasters clip qantas' wings. how the australian airline is cutting back. >> and businesses in india and pakistan are bowled over by
: "fox and friends" starts right now. >> martha: the last on the story out of japan. workers in the failed nuclear physicists riactor site are getting set to go back to work. one report said the workers niver left that site and then reports that they evacuated 50 corgous people who were staying there to try to cool the nuclear physicists reactors . we have had conflicting reports. >> brian: four of those men are missing. they were working on one of the reactors. we'll follow up on that. >> martha: unbelievable story . new pictures show at least two of the plant's reactors are completely destroyed . we have seen the araeil shots . trying to figure out what to do next to prevent a complete meltdown there. >> brian: when tempco was fulling -- pulling out the prime minister demanded what was going on and demanded they go back. >> steve: we'll go to ykoto air force base. david piper is standing by. >>reporter: the new crisis piraling oust control. in a desperate move japanese military helicopter was sent up with a huge bucket of water to dump it on the fukushima plant. they had to
. >> japan is to de commission four of the reactors. tokyo electric power made the announcement three weeks after failing to bring reactors one to four under control. harmful levels of radiation have been detected in the area. the bbc's mark worthington told me owe -- how worrying these radiation levels are. >> they are the most concerning we've had outside the reactors. much higher than anything seen in the vea water until now. suggesting the radioactive material is somehow leaking out. an indication that there's a dispersal 16 kilometers to the south they have been much lower, but elevated levels all adding to the growing concern that this might have some kind of impact on japan's crucial fishery. >> so this is far from being under control. >> yes. and tepco has used almost that phrase saying they cannot say reactors one to four are at this stage under control. they are stabilizing slowly, they say, but because it's such a difficult task and because it's gone on so long and because they believe there's been a part of meltdown and because if you've seen the true scale of destruction, they
in japan, more fears as the damaged nuclear plant spike at 3,000 times the normal level. >>> rebels in libya face more setbacks in the push against moammar gadhafi's forces. u.s. president barack obama says he will not rule out arming the rebels. >>> a decisive moment in syria, the world is waiting to hear what the president will say one day after his cabinet quit. bashar assad will "face the nation" and has been lying low after two weeks of violent clashes between security forces and anti-government protests. thousands have been killed. and they poured into the capital tuesday. it is said the president could be about to lift the emergency law in place since 1963. he will bring you the address live as soon as it begins. >> right now, we're joined by hala gorani. you interviewed the spokesman from the embassy. good to see you. did he say anything about what we can expect bashar to say? >> we have spoken to embassy members and others and we are expecting bashar al-assad to lift the state of emergency that has been in place longer than he has been alive, 1962, the baathi baathi baathis
cuisinart. >> caught on air, disaster in japan, 11:00 p.m. eastern eastern on msnbc. you can have the last word online at our blog, and follow my tweets at lawrence. "the rachel maddow show" is up next. sitting in tonight, chris haze. good evening. >> good evening. thank you for staying with us the next hour. rachel has the night off. >>> the nuclear crisis in japan is still volatile tonight. there have been numerous developments today. we'll get to those shortly. we begin with something you should never have to ask, something that should never be a question. are we at war? yes, we are at war in iraq and afghanistan, and maybe sort of in pakistan as well. but are we at war again in another middle eastern country? it is not a provocative rhetorical question, it is one so-called no fly zone over libya and to take all necessary measures to protect civilians under attack. faced with threat from moammar gadhafi of a massacre of his own civilians, united nations approved military action against libya, which is a big fricking deal. for us, for the united nations, for the region. yet what
questions about who is really responsible. i'm david wright in osaka, japan. >>> and now to an environmental scare closer to home. over the weekend a mile's long patch of sludge showed up in the gulf of mexico and washed up on the shores of louisiana's jefferson parish. the coast guard collected samples and officials say it does not appear to be from the bp oil spill. they say it is probably sediment washed into the gulf from the mississippi river. >>> the suspect in a grizzly murder at a yoga shop will be in court today. brittany norwood has been charged with first-degree murder. police say she killed her coworker and created an elaborate rouse to hide the crime. >> reporter: police say it was a fair of shoes that tipped them off. the crime scene had two sets of bloody footprints but one looked like it was faked. when police found norwood bound and gagged, they say the position she was tied up in was suspicious, with her hands tied above her head, she may have tied herself up. >> as we began analyzing the forensic evidence and looked at the medical reports, it was not supporting what the --
counter-terrorism terrorist. >>> we want to follow the latest on japan, the nuclear disaster and unfortunate news to report. dangerous levels of radiation are now being reported well beyond the government radiation evacuation zone of that nuclear power plant. right now, everyone within 13 miles of the daiichi power station, they have been ordered to leave within a 13 mime radius. now, they say radiation has exceeded radiation levels in a village 25 miles northwest of the plant. the 7,000 people who live there have not been ordered to leave but the iaea is now advising the japanese government to carefully assess the situation there. >>> meantime, two states on the west coast of the united states are reporting low levels of radiation showing up in the milk. health officials in san luis oh b obispo, california are saying it's not a significant threat but still there and not a surprise says blair thompson of the washington dairy commission. let's listen. >>> traveled across the jetstream and pacific ocean and landed on our shores. it's hardly a surprise that happened, expected. r
syria. and this is one we'll keep our eye on as the unrest continue. >>> more alarming news out of japan. the race continues to prevent a nuclear meltdown. but now a contamination crisis. we'll be live in tokyo for that story. >>> plus, going, going, gone. the city that's lost 1/4 of its population in the last decade. you know what city that is? well, find out why all these people are leaving a little later in our show. [ woman ] when you want a bank that travels with you. with you when you're ready for the next move. [ male announcer ] now that wells fargo and wachovia have come together, what's in it for you? unprecedented strength, the stability of the leading community bank in the nation and with 12,000 atms and thousands of branches, we're with you in more ways and places than ever before. with you when you want the most from your bank. [ male announcer ] wells fargo. together we'll go far. with you whever seen anythingst frolikeme neither. it's beneful incredibites. made with wholesome grains, real beef, even carrots and peas. you love the smaller-size, easy-to-chew kibbles, and i
to the brink of civil war. >>> and fears grow in japan as radiation levels at the fukushima power plant skyrocket. >>> quite the post match celebration. an estimated 1 billion people tune in to watch india and pakistan battle it out for a place in the cricket world cup final. >>> we begin this hour in libya, where the focus is on who might be next to defect from moammar gadhafi's regime following the resignation of one of his closest advisors, foreign minister moussa koussa is now in the uk. he's no longer willing to represent the gadhafi regime. his defection is a boost to those hoping to topple gadhafi's nearly 42 year rule. his departure comes as an intelligence source admits to cnn cia is operating inside libya, gathering information to get a better sense of the political and military situation there. on the ground, fighting is continuing to rage between rebels and gadhafi forces and the opposition has retreated between bin jawad and ras lanuf, losing much of the territory they regained. rebels try to recover from their loss. >> reporter: to say this front is fluid is a serious unde
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)